Medical Therapy for Glaucoma: Pilocarpine

A Patient’s Guide to Glaucoma Medications Pilocarpine Medication for Glaucoma How it works: Pilocarpine is a miotic agent which means it constricts the pupil. As the pupil constricts it pulls on the trabecular meshwork, stretching it open. This results in increased...

Medical Therapy for Glaucoma: Rho-Kinase (ROCK) inhibitors

A Patient’s Guide to Glaucoma Medications Rho-Kinase (ROCK) Inhibitors Medication for Glaucoma   Commonly prescribed: In December 2017 netarsudil (brand name: Rhopressa) became the first FDA approved medication in this class[1].  Cap color: White  How it is...

Medical Therapy for Glaucoma: Nitric Oxide Donators

A Patient’s Guide to Glaucoma Medications Nitric Oxide Donators Medication for Glaucoma Commonly prescribed: As of early 2019 Latanoprostene bunod 0.024% (Brand name: VyzultaTM) is the only FDA approved medication in this class. Approved in November, 2017, this...

Medical Therapy for Glaucoma: Prostaglandin Analogs

A Patient’s Guide to Glaucoma Medications Prostaglandin Analogs Medication for Glaucoma A relative newcomer to medical glaucoma treatments. This class has only been FDA approved for a little over two decades. How this class of glaucoma medication works: Although the...

Medical Therapy for Glaucoma: Alpha-Agonists

A Patient’s Guide to Glaucoma Medications Alpha-Agonists Medication for Glaucoma   About this class and how it works: Alpha-agonists have their effect on the ciliary body to reduce production of aqueous fluid. Additionally, like the prostaglandin analogs,...

Medical Therapy for Glaucoma: Beta-blockers

A Patient’s Guide to Glaucoma Medications Beta-blockers for Glaucoma The Beta-blocker class of medications has been used for over half a century. Indeed, all the way up through the turn of the millenium this class was the most commonly prescribed glaucoma medication....

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